A Click Away From Local News Programs

This.ollowed the introduction of front-page advertising on the Journal's European and Asian editions in late 2005. 15 After presenting nearly identical front-page layouts for half a century—always six columns, with the day's top stories in the first and sixth columns, “What's News” digest in the second and third, the “ached” feature story in the fourth and themed weekly reports in the fifth column 16 – the paper in 2007 decreased its broadsheet width from 15 to 12 inches while keeping the length at 223⁄4 inches, to save newsprint costs. BROWSER UPDATE To gain access to the full experience, please upgrade your browser: Chrome | Safari | firebox | Internet Explorer DOB Jones, A NEWS CORP COMPANY News Corp is a network of leading companies in the worlds of diversified media, news, education, and information services. All Right Reserved ACAS ENABLED Change value during the period between open outcry settle and the commencement of the next day's trading is calculated as the difference between the last trade and the current day's settle. The daily was awarded by the Society for News Design World's Best Designed Newspaper award for 1994 and 1997. 21 News Corporation and News Corp edit On May 2, 2007, News Corporation made an unsolicited takeover bid for Dow Jones, offering US$60 a share for stock that had been selling for US$33 a share. The Wall Street Journal has a global news staff of more than 2,000 journalists in 85 news bureaus across 51 countries. 36 37 It has 26 printing plants. 36 WSJ Live became available on mobile units, including pad, in September 2011. 38 WSJ Weekend, the weekend newspaper, expanded September 2010, with two new sections: “Off Duty” and “Review”. Under Kilgore, in 1947, that the paper won its first Pulitzer Prize, for William Henry Grimes's editorials . 5 In 1967, Dow Jones Newswires began a major expansion outside of the United States that ultimately put journalists in every major financial canter in Europe, Asia, Latin America, Australia, and Africa. Would like to see some pictures eventually. Full-time year-round workers 16 and older, 2010-14.

Gerry Baker, editor in chief, just sent out a memo to staff, offering enhanced voluntary severance benefit. The terms, detailed in an FAQ, said it is offering 1.5 times regular severance to those who take the buyout. Anyone in The Journal's news department is eligible. Staff have been invited to send an email to HR by end of day October 31, saying: I [NAME] elect to be considered for the WSJ News Department voluntary severance benefit. Business Insider obtained a copy of the memo. Here it is: As I told you earlier this week, we have begun an extensive review of operations as part of a broader transformation program. There will be, unfortunately, an impact on news department staff in this process. In order to limit the number of involuntary layoffs, we will be offering all news employees around the world - management and non-management - the option to elect to take an enhanced voluntary severance benefit. The terms are described in the attached FAQ. We are seeking a substantial number of employees to elect this benefit, but we reserve the right to reject a volunteer based on business considerations. Employees will be required to sign a separation agreement and release of claims in a form provided by the Company in exchange for the accompanying severance benefits. I regret of course the need for such a move and I appreciate deeply the dedication all of you continue to show through challenging times.

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"We are seeking a substantial number of employees to elect this benefit, but we reserve the right to reject a volunteer based on business considerations," Baker wrote in the memo, which was provided to CNNMoney. "I regret of course the need for such a move and I appreciate deeply the dedication all of you continue to show through challenging times," he added. "Thanks to your hard work, the news department continues to produce world-class journalism every day and I'm confident this process is the right one to set us on the right footing for renewed growth in the years ahead." The enhanced buyout package will be available through October 31. Such announcements have become commonplace in a news media industry plagued by economic uncertainty. They've become relatively frequent at the Wall Street Journal, too. The paper was hit by extensive layoffs last year as part of a reorganization of its coverage areas and a renewed focus on its digital coverage. The grim news didn't end with Baker's memo on Friday. Shortly after it was sent out, Wall Street Journal employees received another email -- this one from the editor of Barron's, Ed Finn. Barron's, like the Journal, is owned by Dow Jones. "The email Gerry Baker just sent about wsj buyouts says that dj is offerings 1.5x the standard buyout package," Finn wrote in the email, according to media reports .

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